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Making a Broken Wrist Compensation Claim

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You have been in the x-ray department of your local hospital for over an hour. Your right wrist is in agony. The doctor who examined you thinks that you’ve broken one or more of the eight carpel bones in your wrist but the x-ray staff can’t find the fracture. The radiologist has taken four x-rays already but the angle hasn’t been quite right to reveal the fracture so you must continue sit there until they do.

If your employer had been willing to resurface the bumpy, broken floor of the storeroom you wouldn’t have tripped and fallen, put out your arm, hit the floor with an agonising jolt and ended up with a swollen, painful wrist in hospital. Last year you broke your left wrist playing in that free for all Sunday morning five-a-side league when that thug bowled you over off the ball. You didn’t go the doctor straight away when that happened and the broken bones did not heal correctly. Your mates said you should have made a claim for broken wrist compensation then because it wasn’t your fault, but you didn’t do anything about it.

Hang on a minute! This accident wasn’t your fault either. You’re not going to be able to go back to work on the building site with only one good hand and they won’t pay you if you don’t turn up. You can’t hold the steering wheel of the car with the bad hand, so won’t be able to drive and get to the supermarket easily – not with the state of the bus service around here. This work accident claim is going to cost. Don’t be a chump; get your mobile out and call a good personal injury solicitor. Hold on; no mobiles allowed in radiology.

If you have broken your wrist due to an accident for which you weren’t to blame and for which a third party was responsible due to their negligence, legal omission or deliberate act, you might be able to make a claim for broken wrist compensation and one of our experienced personal injury solicitors can soon be on hand to assess the viability and value of your claim and then negotiate it effectively to obtain the maximum compensation to which you are entitled.

This really is the least you owe yourself bearing in mind that the initial pain, tenderness, white, numb fingers, swelling and deformity associated with your broken wrist could be the harbinger of nerve and blood vessel damage; that you might have to have surgery to set the bones correctly and repair damaged tissue or insert pins or plates, that the initial splint that they fit will be replaced after several days with a cumbersome cast for several weeks and that you will be a regular visitor to that radiology department so that they can repeatedly x-ray your wrist to monitor the healing. And throughout all of that you won’t be a fully productive employee or perhaps not able to work at all if you undertake manual work. And what if they surgically immobilise your wrist so that it doesn’t function for the rest of your life? All the compensation you are entitled to is the least recompense you can expect after having your life messed about like that due entirely to someone else’s negligence. Don’t wait for your next accident before you act.

Considering Making a Broken Wrist Compensation Claim? Contact us now

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